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ChrisF
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I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over ALL your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or combine two rules that seem similar.

  • Relook over ALL your rules.

  • Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

  • Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

  • Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or combine two rules that seem similar.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over ALL your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or combine two rules that seem similar.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

  • Relook over ALL your rules.

  • Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

  • Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

  • Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or combine two rules that seem similar.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

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I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over allALL your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or just combine two rules that seem similar.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over all your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or just combine two rules.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over ALL your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or combine two rules that seem similar.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.

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I get what you mean by "barrier to entry" You are saying that the rules limit seem too limiting to users when they first sign up. When I began writing rules for my community, I realized it became too specific, SEEMED limiting and was too long. So I took out few rules and shortened the list.

You should implement rules from Day One because the users who were with you since then will seem like you are taking over or infringing on their rights when you begin imposing them weeks or months later. The ground rules should be set and from there they can be amended if needed. So at least there's none of the "I didn't know there was such and such rule" business.

Here's what I suggest (and what I did when fixing my rules):

•Relook over all your rules.

•Choose a few that are MOST important to you and the community. (For mine, it was no pornographic material)

•Now take the other rules that you did not choose as most important and list them from more important to less important.

•Then take out the rules that either seem: Like common sense, implied, unnecessary or just make you seem controlling and limiting. Or just combine two rules.

The list should now be reduced from 10 rules to 5. That's pretty fair.

In the end, rules are rules and whatever rules you impose must be followed and you shouldn't change the most important rules despite what the community says. For example, if my community said that the no pornographic rules was too unfair, I wouldn't take it down because I feel my community isn't the place for that. But if it really comes down to the community not liking an important rules, make the rules less minor or compromise with them.