6 replaced http://communitybuilding.stackexchange.com/ with https://communitybuilding.stackexchange.com/
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I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll disliketry to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

5 Title and Tags
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I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the un-targeteduntargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the un-targeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

4 Title and Tags
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How and when do I attract Attracting experts to a young site that doesn't yet have muchwith little expert content?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargetedun-targeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

How and when do I attract experts to a young site that doesn't yet have much expert content?

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the untargeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

Attracting experts to a young site with little expert content

I'm a member of a new online community that I'd like to see flourish. In order to grow and gain traction we need to increase our user base, in particular by attracting experts in our topic.

What we've done so far:

  1. We seeded the community with a bit of good content, so we do have a little effort to show. It's nothing that would impress an expert but at least it should show that we're trying and that we are building something more than castles in the sky.
  2. We're already doing the un-targeted outreach — tweeting links to interesting questions, blogging about the site in general, and so on.
  3. We already try to attract experts by showing them what we think they'll like and not showing them what we think they'll dislike.

But until there's a body of content that those experts will be interested in, it seems like making specific solicitations will backfire — if I ask the experts I know too early they'll say "nah, nothing there", and then if I ask them later they'll say "nah, already seen that". I do not have a large supply of experts/prospective users, so I want to make the best of the contacts I have. (I am an experienced amateur, so I'm trying to "network up", so to speak.)

So if you need a body of compelling content to get the experts, but it's hard to build that body of compelling content without the experts, how do you solve that? How do we know who to contact and when to do it? What has been shown to work in other communities that seek experts (not just casual forums)?

3 added more detail to clarify that this is after the initial effort, and focus on when to contact the experts, which http://communitybuilding.stackexchange.com/questions/59/how-to-attract-experts-of-the-field-to-my-community didn't even start on
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2 clarified per comments
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1
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