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I'm setting up several micro-magazines in the new year, but I'm concerned about how to communicate with all target markets at the same time.

My magazines each have their own space on the internet, and their own social network, but are very different in nature:

www.website.com / magazines / nature-photography || twitter.com / nature_photography
www.website.com / magazines / rock-music         || twitter.com / rock_music
www.website.com / magazines / fetish-models      || twitter.com / fetish_models

This means that when each issue of the magazine is published, I can simply promote it using the relevant Twitter account.

But the problem is really how to successfully work on each website at the same time using a universal social account:

twitter.com / my_name || twitter.com / my_alias

In theory, this makes a lot of sense because I can use one account to be interviewing or chatting with anyone from a local nature photographer, to a band, to a fetish model, without the need to change accounts. And, I can follow as many different types of people or businesses I feel are relevant to my magazines.

However, can you successfully connect with such a wide audience using only one account, considering the fact that the border between each audience type does not exist? Meaning that all fetish followers see your interactions with nature enthusiasts, and all nature enthusiasts are exposed to your conversations with fetish industry participants?

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You can if you're small.

My spouse is going through a similar issue. He is writing a 5 year arc (issue 2 of 20 just came out!) of his own creation, a 17+ (eq to NC-17) superhero comic book with some scenes just a hair's breath short of porn. This series has its own website (with a domain name), Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. But he does everything under his full legal name.

He has a personal Facebook account which is just for friends and family and a personal Twitter which is public. He talks about all his projects in both.

He's also almost done with a second large comic project, a stand-alone graphic novel aimed at the young adult market. Once that picks up a publisher, he and I will go through and make social media for it too. As for a website, not sure yet. Either it will have its own or we'll make a general one that can have all the "family friendly" work on it together (he also publishes in various anthologies). Yeah, we'll keep the first series separate, with a link to it from a main website.

You can if you're in a niche market.

All of my spouse's work is in comics (or occasional things in comic crossover publications like a mixed anthology). That's a pretty forgiving market when it comes to appealing to a wide range of people.

Paige Braddock does this as well. She is famous for the comic series Jane's World, a strip labeled "too risque for mainstream papers" at the start of its 20-year run. It's a bit different as her strip eventually did hit the mainstream and was never particularly "adult" (it was just lavender). Her new work is Stinky Cecil, a comic series aimed at elementary school children.

Sometimes you can if you're well-known.

Judy Blume lists all her books, from elementary school level to pretty risque adult, all together on her website.

So what about social media?

You're talking more about things like using the same Twitter account for everything. And I think that's a mistake.

Why would you use the same account when Twitter (and Facebook and Instagram) are free? It's a bit of a pain but not hard to switch from one to the other. Another advantage is that people that only want to follow one of your projects (or one set of related ones) can do that without clutter. You can still so some cross posting to encourage followers to check out your other work.

Websites range from free to cheap and I see no reason to combine two very different communities into one, unless you're very tiny. I mean I have a blog with genealogy and recipes and travel info as my main focuses but it's mostly for friends and family so I don't bother to separate the streams (the issue here isn't appropriateness but boredom).

I don't see a problem with putting the occasional "check out my adult works" link on your PG-rated sites or "got kids? they might like my ___ site" links on your adult ones.

Exceptions?

Hardcore porn.
If you're a teacher or another profession where you need to hide what you're doing.
Anything else where crossing the streams could be dangerous or lead to trouble.

  • Thanks - Glad to see someone has the same issue I'm facing. My website isn't a problem as I have one domain which holds multiple magazines - Each with it's own Twitter, and hidden from any other ( unless listed in the links section ). My problem is communicating with the people who I write about on a personal level. It seems much easier to be talking to a local school band at the same time as talking to a fetish model, without the need to constantly switch accounts. Problem is keeping my conversations with fetish models hidden from parents of the local band who may pottentially follow me. – Wayne FA Dec 20 '18 at 21:29
  • @WayneFA Got it. I wasn't sure from your question about the level of NSFW you were dealing with or exactly what you were already doing. Some school districts go ballistic if they find out an adult working with kids has any dealings with sexual content beyond their own private heterosexual marriage. And then some of us live in California :-D It also matters if you want things hidden or secret, which is very different. – Cyn Dec 20 '18 at 21:39
  • Thanks. I've just discovered "TweetDeck", which has a thing called "Teams". From what I've seen so far it means that I can potentially set up a ghost account where I follow whoever I like, from local people & friends, to bands, to fetish models & beyond. I can then add my other accounts as team members. So when I see a tweet that is interesting, I can "like", "retweet" and "comment" using a "_ As" option. This means I can now monitor a single timeline of content, & connect with the account holders using any of my other accounts that are relevant - Exactly the sort of thing I was looking to do. – Wayne FA Dec 21 '18 at 21:19
  • Interesting @WayneFA. Reviews are so-so...seems it used to be a good tool, then twitter bought it and stripped out most functionality. But there are other paid tools out there. I hope you'll come back after some test time with a thread on these tools. I personally hate Twitter and have never gotten comfortable with it (I can't manage to make it do what I need on my iPhone and the desktop functions are purposely hobbled). So maybe a good app is what I need to do the marketing I need to do. – Cyn Dec 21 '18 at 23:27
  • I remember it being a dark interface, but now it's white so seems quite different. I'm not a fan of any network really, but I find twitter easier because posts are short and to the point, and you get a true timeline, where facebook only shows what it thinks you want to see. Seems like TD will allow me to post as any of my magazines while simply acting as one account. I'm not sure where I'd post such a thread on the stack without it being flagged as "not a question" or "off topic", but I'm sure I'll be writing something about my experiences with it some time soon. – Wayne FA Dec 22 '18 at 8:49

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