11

A long-standing rule of thumb is that a user who wants to avoid a ban will find a way to avoid the ban. At the end of the day, getting rid of ban evaders is a battle you cannot win. You can only make it harder for them to notice, and evade the ban. The various forms of silent bans (hellban being the prime example) are already very hard to notice - assuming ...


10

These ideas are drawn in large part from Stack Exchange and partly from anti-spam techniques. Filtering If there are patterns in the trolling, you could take a page from automated anti-spam measures and apply pattern-matching to the problem. This depends on how well you can characterize trolling messages, of course; start building a corpus. There may be ...


9

Definitely don't talk to him about knowing who he is/that you contacted FBI. He will understand his "mistake" and fix it for the next time. Contact FBI and police again, probably ask what is going on. They have unlikely forgot about him, and it is likely that they will benefit from your help. Tell him some nonsense about his ban, probably just answer not-so-...


9

I would NOT level with him that you know who he is. All that will do is let him know that you have the ability to recognize who he is and try to figure out ways to be less obvious next time. What you can do is a) report it again. There may not have been enough to go on at the time, but if he's doing more, it's new information. It might still not be ...


8

The ultimate advantage in allowing a user to register using their social network credentials is that it saves them time. The user doesn't want to go through that mundane process of filling out yet another email address field or generating a new password, and so being able to avoid that through the click of just a few buttons arguably converts a user into a ...


6

For every technological approach you can come up with, a determined user can come up with a way to evade it -- new browser, security/privacy-related browser plugins, fake credentials, and so on. I think this is an area where you do the basics that are easy and routine, but it's not worth investing heavily. That leaves the behavioral side. If the new user ...


6

I haven't been in exactly the same situation but in my (fan fiction) community people primarily communicate as characters, so while we sometimes do end up finding out people's real names, we often have banned members sneak back in simply by changing their name and email. We have two main filters for this: First, and primarily, is the IP address. Although ...


5

Many forum software implementations such as vBulletin and XenForo, have a 'hobbling' or 'discouragement' feature for problematic users, which will make the users browsing session seem to fail with slow loading pages, fake error messages, etc. This function is an addon ("Miserable Users") in vBulletin, and is a stock feature in XenForo ("Discouraged Users"). ...


4

Using a third party to manage your user's identities only makes it slightly more inconvenient for users to create duplicate accounts, it doesn't stop them. If allow sign up via Facebook, Twitter and Google+ say, then a person could create three accounts on your system one each with each of the external sources. To create more they'd have to create duplicate ...


4

Reddit uses a technique known as "shadow-banning", which lets users think they are posting when they're really not. Your trolls would have no idea when they are or are not banned, which is a good deterrent. They'd never know when they had to refresh their IP! Of course, shadow-banning has become a horrifying 1984-esque totalitarian nightmare on Reddit as ...


3

SomethingAwful's forums require payment to post (or at least they did when I used to read their columns.) This may stop trolls or at least make it unbearably expensive to get repeatedly banned, while giving you a return for your wasted time and effort. If your community has critical mass, it could work. You would likely wish to migrate existing users for ...


3

Depending on the community size, it may be rather trivial to notice that you've been hellbanned/shadowbanned. If you have to implement one of the ban types you mentioned, slowbans are probably your best bet as they are the hardest to detect... even Internet routing issues could cause the behavior they're seeing. In fact, it might not be a bad idea to only ...


3

Actually, everything that you use to track someone can be cleared or changed. There are just some not-so-standard things you can try: Browser fingerprinting (with this tool for example). Note that this data can be easily changed by using an add-on such as FireGloves. Evercookie. This tool stores some data at many places, so it's hard to clear. Note that ...


2

A lot of the answers here seem to focus on hellbans/shadowbans but don't make very good mention of the other types of bans. In most cases, username bans are going to be the most effective against your target. While people can get around bans by creating a new account or changing their IP, determined users will get around these bans. Unless there is a hoop ...


1

In agreement with everyone else in that there is no fool-proof way to accomplish what you are asking for. That said, the best you can do is to consistently implement checks for small things you might notice as the undesired behavior is being carried out. For example, in the typical forum or community scenario, most "bad actor" users trying to get around ...


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