19

Users leaving your site could be a good thing as well as a bad thing. Undoing the damage will take some planning, endurance, and patience. Good thing: The policy change has caused members who are disruptive, violent, non-productive, and generally not good for the community to leave. If this was the point of your policy change then I commend you for a ...


18

I'd let others be the judge of whether your mistake is "too big" or not. So I'd recommend continuing with your application. It's up to the people hiring to take everything into consideration and make the decision to hire you (or not) based on that. One aspect of being a moderator/admin for an online community is knowing when to hold up your hands and say: ...


14

It should mostly go like this: Reverse the call Apologize to the affected parties If necessary and possible, explain the reasons for your actions Moderate the backslash itself I think point 4 is pretty important, if non-obvious; you might not want to deal with complaints about moderation with more moderations. However, if your community is about X and the ...


10

Ouch. You have a few problems here: Recovering the misappropriated funds. I assume you are already pursuing legal remedies here. Figuring out what was broken in your governance that allowed this to happen. Why did this go undetected for so long? Restoring trust in the community. You're asking about #3, but #2 is going to be part of the answer too. (My ...


10

What have you done about the mistake? Have you talked to anyone about the command? If it was a problem with the command itself, you need to report the bug. If it was an issue with your understanding of the command, does the documentation need to be changed? Would it help if the command had a big confirmation "Doing this will delete all your possessions. ...


9

It's important to come to an agreement as a mod team first. If the acting mod doesn't feel what they did was unwarranted, you've got bigger troubles than community reaction. Get it sorted out before you handle the community. If the acting mod agrees to participate in mitigating what happened, the best course for the acting mod to apologize and take whatever ...


8

Patreon, a crowd-funding community for individual creators of all types, recently had a controversy like this. They announced that they would now start charging patrons -- the funders -- credit-card fees and other surcharges. Then it turned out that they were misrepresenting what they pay creators and their new fees would be punitive for smaller donors. ...


8

I agree with cw1998's post about making an announcement, but I think this is more an issue of balancing user privacy and your happiness, and you should be very careful about how you handle it with these specific regards: Don't give out information that the system doesn't presently give them. If the community can't tell which moderator took the action, which ...


5

The first thing to do now is to identify what's wrong with the latest release. Is it just "people hate change?" Is it truly a bad modification? Without knowing what's wrong with the new software update, it's pretty hard to know what how to fix it. Perhaps it's just people don't like change itself, and the modification is perfectly fine. Perhaps there's a ...


4

Your fellow moderators should be open to criticism and be willing to account for mistakes. The first thing should involve talking to them about it if you are concerned about something. If there are others, you can first ask them if they want to say something as well. Don't start off by "ganging-up" on anyone. You can start off by mentioning the specific ...


2

Analyzing web trends month over month is too long to wait. It is better to look at weekly data. I recommend an apology and revert the policy and post on a reply on the "Dear John" (good bye, see you later) letters. I suspect the change you made was harsh and a disaster. So you must apologize to have a chance to recover. The internet is extremely fickle.


2

The first step is to figure out if it was an incorrect action or simply one you personally disagree with. If you are in a position to over-rule a moderator without them feeling slighted, then this doesn't really matter. If you are not, then discuss the action with the applicable moderator and reach a conclusion about the action in a way that won't cause ...


2

If you have the permissions, I would create an announcement explaining the entire situation in full. Preferably I would get an admin to post such an announcement as, to be honest, not as many people will be against the admin as they would maybe a moderator. And also the admin will probably have a stronger voice in the community and more people will take his ...


2

Sometimes people on the team make mistakes. As an example, I used to moderate a video game server, and on a couple of occasions, users were banned/suspended by individuals from the administrative team when the rest of the team agreed the action should not have been taken. This is completely normal due to the fallibility of human nature. Any community member,...


1

At the vary least you need to fire or remove these people from running the community. I would also consider talking to a lawyer on what you can do to get the money back but this depends on exactly what you mean by "Swindled" and the amount. You also need to he honest with your community which means tell them exactly what's going on and ask for suggestions ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible